Categories
Teaching

Design Charrettes for CS

Almost time to start the detailed planning for the 2019-2020 school year and among the things I relearned this summer at CS4Teachers at the UW was design charrettes. This was a lesson worked on with students who do the K12 outreach for HCDE (Human Centered Design & Engineering) program at the U of W and essentially ran like this article https://www.hcde.washington.edu/news/charettes-k-12-outreach. A quick glance around the UW campus found other places like the CBE (College of Built Environments) http://archpac.be.uw.edu/new-student-charrette/ using them as well.

I will start working on the details the week before school starts as I intend to use this as a new student introduction activity in my IB (International Baccalaureate) CS classes. It isn’t because they require that level of expertise, simply that they really lend themselves to organizing and teaching the process and time for designing and implementing a project which is a key for the year for that program.

It would be really cool to put it into play in the regular course, perhaps in outlining a Mobile game interface, mostly because the Marvel App (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.marvelapp) made ALL the difference along with the practice.

Reflection: I learned Design Charrettes a few years ago and yet they didn’t jump out at me as they did now that I wish to have a quick way to provide a fundamental design experience to an entire class without lecturing.

Categories
Hacks

Hacktoberfest 2017

IMG_20171101_134454I had my IB students sign up for Hacktoberfest which is open to everyone in the global community!

The learning target was to learn how to participate in the global open source software development community.

  • Seen here, the first student with a shirt awarded for making four pull requests between October 1–31 in any timezone. Pull requests can be to any public repo on GitHub. Pull requests reported by maintainers as spam or that are automated will be marked as invalid and won’t count towards the shirt.

A powerful statement about the kind of learner who can be successful in software engineering!