Categories
Teaching

Adolescent Development

I recently attended a well run Professional Development day for CTE teachers within my school district. While everything we did is student focused and data driven, it struck me that we were no longer considering developmental levels, what can be or should be accomplished at each level. Instead we are driven to have every student at every level develop and maintain awareness that only a short time ago would have been considered above their grade/development level.

This article crossed my desk this morning while I wrestle this point of moving everything down until I can only assume a PK student has a career plan, selected my courses, and begun preparing themselves for success on my TSA.

https://www.vox.com/first-person/2019/1/10/18174263/anxiety-kids-burnout

Categories
Teaching

One Thing I Want My Students To Say

I saw this here.  I don’t believe all of this is critical thinking, nor is all of it difficult; however, it certainly does begin to overwhelm me a little, would it be #edushame continued from Educators who no longer are in a classroom? 

I am beginning to think about this topic.  But when I look at this I do wonder how “Thank You” is part of this…and then it begins to spin a little…just a thought from the journal today.

Categories
Teaching

Writing Learning Outcomes

I was reviewing learning outcomes as I am targeting using them more and more for classes.

I ran across this key tip while reviewing another great packt publishing book: Moodle Course Design Best Practices.  Look for it to be published soon

a verb and an impact (“in order to”) phrase.

https://www.library.illinois.edu/staff/infolit/learningoutcomes/
Categories
Teaching

A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy

Categories
Computer Science

Developer Survey Results 2018

https://insights.stackoverflow.com/survey/2018/

This year, over 100,000 developers told us how they learn, build their careers, which tools they’re using, and what they want in a job.

Each year, we ask the developer community about everything from their favorite technologies to their job preferences. This year marks the eighth year we’ve published our Annual Developer Survey results—with the largest number of respondents yet. Over 100,000 developers took the 30-minute survey this past January.

This year, we covered a few new topics ranging from artificial intelligence to ethics in coding. Here are a few of the top takeaways from this year’s results:

  • DevOps and machine learning are important trends in the software industry today. Languages and frameworks associated with these kinds of works are on the rise, and developers working in these areas command the highest salaries.
  • Only tiny fractions of developers say that they would write unethical code or that they have no obligation to consider the ethical implications of code, but beyond that, respondents see a lot of ethical gray. Developers are not sure how they would report ethical problems, and have differing ideas about who ultimately is responsible for unethical code.
  • Developers are overall optimistic about the possibilities that artificial intelligence offers, but are not in agreement about what the dangers of AI are.
  • Python has risen in the ranks of programming languages on our survey, surpassing C# in popularity this year, much like it surpassed PHP last year.
  • When assessing a prospective job, different kinds of developers apply different sets of priorities. Women say their highest priorities are company culture and opportunities for professional development, while men say their highest priorities are compensation and working with specific technologies.

Want to dive into the results yourself? In a few weeks, we’ll make the anonymized results of the survey available for download under the Open Database License (ODbL). We look forward to seeing what you find!